treereflection-e1438390050151.jpg

 Garden July 28th

In an earlier post I reviewed our issues with weed control and the plan appears to be working.

Brush2There are still several areas where the weeds are dominating. As we looked at these wild uncontrolled areas we noticed a considerable amount of common milkweed plants. Which was brought to my attention by my granddaughter. I consider milkweed a weed and would have started figuring out how to get rid of them.

milkweed3 She explained to me that her science teacher has encouraged her students to promote the common milkweed in the wild because the monarch butterfly seeks out milkweed as a habitat and an eating station. The larvae hatch and continue to live off the milkweed plants.

There is concern that the monarch butterfly is losing their habitat to climate change.  So this felt like a good project to foster a home for monarch butterflies and the idea to develop this weed patch into a wild flower garden became a reality. My granddaughter was excited to participate and I welcomed her help.

DaisyyellowWe started looking over the area noting several colorful wild flowers flourishing in the dense weed area. Why not make this into a wild flower garden alongside our vegetable garden? The garden would also provide the monarch butterfly a natural habitat.  So, we needed to identify the flowers since most of them were not familiar. Actually, they were familiar. In my past, I considered them weeds.

Flower9I am now experiencing a whole new appreciation for flowering weeds!  Their beauty will be constant since most wild flowers act like perennials and return each year. They may also benefit companion gardening.  My granddaughter, and my son have taken pictures of some of the flowers. If you recognize any of them, please share their name and information on their growing patterns. Any information will help us on our journey to build a wild flower garden.

Flower2 (1)